Debunking stupid BPD/EUPD Stigma & Misconception

Mental illness could be considered one of the many most commonly misunderstood, and stigmatised health problem inmy personal opinon, and lets be honest, it is far from easy no matter what mental illness you posess. One thing that definately doesnt help is stigmatised, Misconcepted & stereotypes from the common Karen who just doesnt get it. So today, I’m going to debunk the most hated BPD/EUPD stigmas and Misconceptions.

Disclaimer: We would like to make it clear that we do not claim to be professionals and can not give professional advice as this is simply not our forte. We speak about subjects and talking topics through experiences and information gained from other professionals. If you are in need of information on any topic that we talk through, please contact the appropriate specialist through the lists of numbers provided.

What is BPD/EUPD?

As described by Rethink.org “Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is also known as ‘emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD)’. In England, doctors use both of these terms. If your doctor says you have EUPD, they may say you have ‘borderline’ or ‘impulsive’ type EUPD.”

This leads me onto the first stigma:

Myth #1: “If You Know One Person With BPD, You Know Them All”

Many people believe that people with the diagnosis of BPD/EUPD are all angry and destructive and attention-seeking and they would like to label us and that is simply a myth. 

Currently, there are 4 types of BPD that deal with their illnesses in different ways that are explained by https://www.healthline.com/ (Check out the article for more)

  1. discouraged (“quiet”) borderline
  2. self-destructive borderline
  3. impulsive borderline
  4. petulant borderline”

But it wouldn’t be surprising if there are more types of BPD that isn’t recognised as of yet as it is particularly difficult to diagnose

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Myth #2: BPD Behaviour is Just Attention Seeking and Should Be Ignored

I agree you should ignore Attention Seeking Behaviour. Because it is far from Attention seeking behaviour, all we need is some help and understanding from an empathetic heart. 

As someone with a complex mental illness, it would be surprising to think that at some point we have all been labelled as Attention Seeking, Dramatic, Controlling, Manipulative etc etc etc. 

If understood correctly, that isn’t the case. 

Most of the time, people constitute self-harm, pushing people away, and other destructive and impulsive behaviour as attention-seeking and that isn’t the case. 

Most often than not, we are trying to call for help and that is the only way we can say help me without uttering the words because actually saying the words themself “means we are weak” – and I definitely know rings true for myself. 

Myth #3: Having BPD is a choice.

A brief overview of Symptoms for BPD is Emotional Instability, Disturbed Patterns of thinking, Impulsive behaviour and unstable relationships. (NHS website) 

BPD is considered to be the most psychologically painful mental illness (Wikipedia). 

Everything felt, every emotion, every memory is felt like it touches raw sin. 

And it hurts whether good or bad. 

And frankly, it’s horrible. 

We fear that we are going to be abandoned again, whether real or imaginary, no matter if times are for the sweet or sinner, and honestly, I would rather have anything else but this. 

Having to ask for constant reassurance that I am loved is debilitating. I would much prefer to actively know that I am loved and appreciated by many instead of having to constantly ask or remind myself. 

The majority of my time is talking to myself as if I am my own parents, I have to be a disciplinarian and fun.

 If you ever think that we choose this then honestly you need to think again, because you couldn’t be more wrong, 

As someone with a complex mental illness, it would be surprising to think that at some point we have all been labelled as Attention Seeking, Dramatic, Controlling, Manipulative etc etc etc. 

If understood correctly, that isn’t the case. 

Most of the time, people constitute self-harm, pushing people away, and other destructive and impulsive behaviour as attention-seeking and that isn’t the case. 

Most often than not, we are trying to call for help and that is the only way we can say help me without uttering the words because actually saying the words themself “means we are weak” – and I definitely know rings true for myself. 

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Myth #4: Borderline Personality Disorder Is Not Treatable

Psychotherapy, Dialectable Behaviour Therapy, Mentalisation based therapy, Therapeutic Communities, Medication and Art Therapy. 

These are all types of programmes that can help treat BPD, and somehow make life a little easier. 

But let’s not get confused. Just because someone is going to therapy and is taking medication doesn’t mean that they are all okay they don’t suffer anymore, because by golly yes they do!! 

Being a borderline in recovery is hard work, very hard work, as we are not just dealing with one mental illness, the majority of the time we are dealing with a few. 

Most commonly it is either, Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, or CPTSD, Eating disorder, another personality disorder, so on and so forth. 

Myth #5: People with BPD cannot lead their own independent, fulfilling lives 

People with BPD are just like any other person. There is such a vast range of different types of BPD, from Quiet BPD to Impulsive/Explosive BPD. Also, it is commonly known that there is a high chance someone with BPD has more than one diagnosis meaning that the range of skills and abilities differ from person to person (just like anybody else). 

So having the pretence that all people with BPD, cannot look after themselves enough to be independent, is really silly. Essentially, you are tarnishing us with the same brush and that isn’t okay. 

Knowing that there are many celebrities out there who suffer from BPD, independently speaks volumes.

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